Review of 13:24 by Dr. Kim Etherington, Professor Emeritus, Bristol University, UK

By Dr. Kim Etherington, Professor Emeritus, Bristol University, UK:

“It’s not an easy read at times, facing as it does the darkness of abuse. However, this is an era when none of us can deny the reality of abuse and by becoming aware of the impact on the victims maybe we can help shape a healthier society.”

“Rarely does one find a book that manages to convey the complexity of the impact of physical and emotional violence on children and their subsequent lives, while also gripping the reader, like a good thriller.
Mr. Hickmon writes with the clarity, power and passion of someone who really knows what he is writing about, and who understands the wide range of responses human beings experience when trying to deal with lives affected by ongoing trauma. There are textbooks that explain the scientific mechanisms that underpin Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, but this book tells a story that reaches out to help us all understand. It should be read by survivors, parents, clergy, health professionals, social workers, and therapists. Or indeed by anyone who wants a good read!
It’s not an easy read at times, facing as it does the darkness of abuse. However, this is an era when none of us can deny the reality of abuse and by becoming aware of the impact on the victims maybe we can help shape a healthier society.”

Review of 13:24 by Nadine Block, author of ‘This Hurts Me More Than It Hurts You.’

From Nadine Block, author of ‘This Hurts Me More Than It Hurts You.’: 

“…manages to include a powerful amount of information about the science of corporal punishment, fetishisms, evangelical parenting teaching and more.”

“Although certain to be controversial, this is a unique and very interesting book. The story is engagingly written for a general audience, with descriptive scenes, well-drawn characters, and a lot of emotional and moving dialogue. The author obviously has a personal understanding of the harm that can result from corporal punishment, of the effects of biblical interpretations in perpetuating it, and of the pain and shame of children who are abused.
As with other popular entertainment, I had a hard time with portions because they were so raw and violent. In spite of this, the young protagonist remains a sad but appealing character, experiencing life in a drug and poverty cycle. Another effective element is the portrayal of the counter culture music scene and of the kids who are involved.
The author manages to include a powerful amount of information about the science of corporal punishment, fetishisms, evangelical parenting teaching, and more. The group therapy sessions seemed quite authentic and the pastoral counseling section was chilling. In giving information, Dr. Dan, the psychiatrist, seems to come off best.
Overall, the book is successful, making a poignant statement in a format that is certain to appeal to a wide audience.”